Letters to the Editor week of 8-19-10

279

Zoning help?

To the Editor:

The response, or rather the lack of it, to the Facebook site “Switzerland County Citizens Advisory Committee” discussion forum has been extremely disappointing and disheartening to me. My thought was that perhaps not that many people are into Facebook.

Then I joined the Facebook “Vevay Mainstreet” site, which appears to be dedicated to advertising Vevay’s businesses and events. At the time of this writing, it has 1,541 “friends.”

Does no one have an opinion about the development of the new comprehensive plan, and the people who will help create it? Or is this more personal? Do you not want me to continue working to attempt to organize the CAC, which as of now does not exist? I will gladly step back if this is the case. The last thing I want is to be the reason our community does not move forward with the necessary steps toward the creation of a good plan that will help grow our county and protect its residents.

In fact, back in June, I wrote down several ideas that have been in my head, some for years, which I thought would help develop our county, while retaining its character and respecting its residents. Last Wednesday I met with a resident who has been active in several groups, and presented her with my ideas. She liked almost every one of them, and suggested that I present them in letters to the editor. Others have had similar ideas, one of which I read in last Thursday’s paper. Way to go, Patriot!

The rest of my ideas might well fill up the newspaper. So for now, even though I am not sure this is the appropriate forum, I will start posting them on the Switzerland County Citizens Advisory Committee site.

Look at them if you like.

Traci Weber

Switzerland County resident

‘Home’town

Dear Editor:

For many years now I have desired to express my written thanks and appreciation to the residents and to the community of Switzerland County, Indiana. I have much gratitude for the education and academic preparation provided by the Jefferson-Craig Elementary School, the Vevay Junior High School, the Vevay High School and finally the Switzerland County High School. I am more grateful to my family and the local community for the example set by their Christian beliefs, their patriotism, their citizenship and the community morality. That living example has stayed with me these past 40 years, serving as a guide and measure for my own behavior and a standard of expectation of others.

I was born at the King’s Daughters’ Hospital in Madison in 1 952, but lived and grew up in Craig Township, living there until 1971. The majority of my growing years were s pent in the vicinity of Braytown, Five Points, Splinter Ridge and Little Doe Run. I left Indiana in 1971, not to return except for the occasional short visits to family and friends.

Since leaving Switzerland County I have lived and worked in many communities from Alaska to Texas, and Ohio to Virginia. I have attended various schools in Alabama, Indiana, Kentucky, Ohio and Virginia. Not once did I ever feel unprepared for the new culture of an unfamiliar community nor unprepared for higher education at any of the schools I attended.

It was with deep regret that I saw the changes to the county and Vevay during my visits “home.” Some of the changes appear tragic; the significant loss of family farmsteads, the closing of family owned stores and the loss of local industries. Conversely, I noted the increase in employment opportunity created by the casino and hotel(s). Also, I was pleased to see an increase of new farms from a growth in the Amish community.

It appears that time spares no community from change. I trust that the changes that come to Switzerland County and Vevay are necessary changes; I trust that these changes that will not impact the foundations of Christian beliefs, good citizenship and a belief in selfless service to our nation.

I fear that are few communities in our nation today like “home.” I fear that few still kindle the Christian culture, and the roots of citizenship and patriotism. If there ever was a time in our nation’s history that we need a well founded community in which to rear children and grow families, now is such a time.

Thanks to all of you who helped rear me, teaching me good morals, providing me a good example and instilling in me a belief that we need to give something back to the nation for what the nation has given to us.

With best regards,

Philip L. Webber

Switzerland County High School Class of 1970

Midlothian, Virginia

Wake up call

To the Editor:

What a wonderful country we live in, the good old U.S.A. But we are not really old compared to England, France, China, Etc. We are free to practically do anything within the laws. We own land, we travel from state to state without visas or passports, we can buy about anything we want as long as our money and credit holds out.

But how long will this country stand the way we are going in debt? We the people need to pull together. We keep buying imported stuff when there are just as good or better products made in this country.

The good book says to love your neighbor as yourself. Do we think of our neighbor when we purchase new kitchen appliances or vehicles, or even toothpaste? Do we check to see where the product is assembled or made when we buy something? Every time we buy a large or small item not made in the United States, then there goes more jobs out of the country, and it could be your neighbor’s job or even yours.

The people in Washington wouldn’t try to tell us what to buy even if they could because it would get our lenders upset. Now it’s up to us. We need to watch what we buy and keep our money and jobs in this country and they can keep their slave labor in their countries.

My example of slave labor is quoted from “Solidarity” magazine, “Chinese workers making locks for Honda went on strike asking for $1.34 an hour and better working conditions.”

Is that just a small oversight on our part or do we really care if we survive? This would indeed be a dark world if we didn’t have the good old U.S.A.

Gene Parks

Bennington